read a book, what book? :: building booklists for children

I must admit that browsing through the shelves of the local public library is how a portion of everyday reading is found, for myself and for the children.  We skim a section, and take home books of interest.

Important to me is teaching how to choose books, new genres to explore (including fiction and non-fiction), and generally allowing our kiddos to enjoy the library without too much of Mom ‘hovering’.

All this said, there is quite an intentionality behind the scenes as well. Usually I’ve already requested books for them ahead of time and they await us on our visits.  We are blessed with an excellent inter-library system, allowing for online access to all books in our county’s 18 or so libraries and  transportation to the one closest…for free.

A homeschooler’s dream!

While our children have freedom to choose, Mama does a fair share of picking through literature for them to enjoy.  I have always loved children’s literature and will likely continue long after the littlest one is older.  There are so many rich stories, daring adventures, moving tales, and hilarious escapades to be found between the covers of a book!

So, we seek out the best of stories to read…

When I say ‘booklists’, I do mean keeping a list of good books found — either for purchasing or remembering in the future as the next child comes along.  My mind is not that sharp.

And in our home education, exceptional literature is the backbone of all we’re attempting to accomplish across the curriculum.  But if a list is unimportant, resources for finding a great story can still be helpful.

Today, I offer a smorgasbord of support outside of browsing those library shelves.

:: :: ::

Books about Books

Read for the Heart: Whole Books for Wholehearted Families by Sarah Clarkson :: new to our shelves!  I met the author’s mother, Sally Clarkson last year and she gave this one to me for review.

Books Children Love by Elizabeth Wilson

Books to Build On by E.D. Hirsch

Books That Build Character by William Kilpatrick

The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer :: even if classical education is not your family’s path, there are several great stories referenced in this book!

1001 Children’s Books to Read Before You Grow Up by Julia Eccleshare :: a super-thick, but colorful resource!

Literature for Lively Lessons :: a favorite of mine {read my review over at Curriculum Choice}.  Book titles arranged by subject and monthly theme focus, complete with author birthdays and celebrations such as National Poetry Month, etc.

(remember to check your local library, many of these titles may be available there)

Catalogs that Can Help

In the homeschooling arena, several curriculum catalogs can be accessed for great choices, especially in the subjects of history or science:

Winter Promise Publishing :: based on a Charlotte Mason approach, you’ll find their catalog full of titles to consider!

Sonlight Curriculum :: also literature-based with excellent booklists

Veritas Press :: classical ed based, numerous history titles

 

Online Booklists or Resources

Christian Children’s Book Review :: I’ve reference this one several times, particularly at holidays, though it’s not a staple.  Several gems found here though!

Ambleside Online :: a free Charlotte Mason curriculum, complete with booklists by grades

Real Learning :: a huge plethora of titles arranged to focus on each letter of the alphabet and many, many science titles for preschoolers & up!

1000 Good Books Lists :: numerous books to consider, classics mostly, for primary through high school

 

Surely, there are more resources than could be listed here!  These are simply ones I’ve used and will continue to peruse through.

If you have any others, drop a note and I’ll include in this list.  Also, check out my other homeschooling resources & recommendations!

 

“The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”
~ Dr. Seuss

{photo credit}

 

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5 comments

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